Much to win, much to learn

Iain McWhirter looks at the media and policy response to the economic crisis and argues that while there may be some bias, this simply means the left must raise its game. Why does it always take mayhem before the media takes notice? The student demonstration on 10/11/10, which was overwhelmingly peaceful and good humoured,...

Agenda 15 – Reprise

The Scottish Left Review has produced Agenda 15, a programme of action designed to aid transition from the current crisis in public policy towards a fairer, more sustainable and more effective Scottish society. It proposes a range of actions which can be taken in the Scottish Parliamentary term between 2011 and 2015....

The case for privatising schools

If the case for university fees really stands up then the case holds for almost any public service. Isobel Lindsay argues that there is a much more important vision for the future of Scotland’s universities. Why are we continuing with free secondary education? Seven years of primary schooling are surely sufficient to...

The left is not dead

Doug Bain was an active participant in Scottish Left Review Editorial Board meetings up until his untimely death last month. Here, in one of the last things he wrote, he responds to an attack on the relevance of left-wing politics published in the Scotsman. I read your article with interest. However I have to say I don’t...

The mask of reputational spin

The impact of ‘reputational management’ leaves us all in need of protection from the ideologies of neoliberalism, argues Chris Holligan. The maintenance of reputation by universities and individual academics through the metrics of league tables and the knowledge objects called ‘outputs’ has taken a high profile...

Are we nearly there yet?

For 50 years trade unions have been arguing that proper provision of childcare is central to improving the lives of many workers. As Ann Henderson shows, progress is simply not fast enough. Good quality, accessible childcare is an essential component of our society today. There is a shortage of places, with demand far...

How good men do evil things

The publication of Tony Blair’s memoirs has once again sparked off public interest in Blair’s legacy. Gary Fraser explores why Blair continues to dominate politics today and ponders the biggest question of all, why did he invade Iraq? If a poll were cast tomorrow to find out who is Britain’s most unpopular person there is...

Terrorism of information

Continuing our series on the post-crash political situation in other countries, Giannis Banias explains how the focus on the violent street protests in Greece have been used to disguise the real political terrorism of the IMF. There is more than one side to the crisis today’s world is facing, financial, social, cultural and...

Kick Up The Tabloids 61

LITTER SHORTAGE PANIC – NOTHING FOR POOR TO PICK UP I’m not a betting man but I now wish that back in May I had put a five-pound treble on Anne Widdecombe becoming a reality TV star, Boris Johnston being leader of the opposition and the Lib Dems performing a U-turn on tuition fees before the year was out. I would...

Three wise men?

Dave Watson looks at the report of the Independent Budget Review and in the predictable recycling of the same-old neoliberal agenda finds few signs of wisdom. Five months in the preparation we now have the Report of the Independent Budget Review Panel (IBR). Commissioned by the Scottish Government, at the behest of the Tories,...